{Free pdf} AWOL on the Appalachian TrailAuthor David Miller – Entrecielos.co

I m a sucker for any long distance hiking anything book They give me a false sense of I could totally do that, even though I get cranky if I don t shower every morning and the longest hike I ve ever taken was 6 hours, and that was 16 years ago, and it was ONE time, and I m pretty sure I complained the entire way His matter of fact style of writing was really enjoyable for this type of book It threatened to get a little dry sometimes, but I never got bored I appreciate not having to listen I m a sucker for any long distance hiking anything book They give me a false sense of I could totally do that, even though I get cranky if I don t shower every morning and the longest hike I ve ever taken was 6 hours, and that was 16 years ago, and it was ONE time, and I m pretty sure I complained the entire way His matter of fact style of writing was really enjoyable for this type of book It threatened to get a little dry sometimes, but I never got bored I appreciate not having to listen to long winded explanations of the beauty of a certain stump of wood, or some rambling existentialism they have their place in some books of this nature, but this is a succinct, anti climactic, cut dry this is what happened when I walked a gazillion miles journal thing Can t complain, it was really interesting, he didn t overdramtize for the sake of suspense, just a solid, factual account of one guy s hike through 11 states Worth the read if you re into this genre The best thing about this book is that my son would easily fall asleep when I read it to him He focuses on tedious descriptions of the less interesting aspects of hiking while glossing over or ignoring the interesting locations and their history There were not enough pictures and those included were of poor quality and in black and white at least in the kindle version His transitions were jumpy and sometimes confusing It was really just a log of events lacking any meaningful insights or in The best thing about this book is that my son would easily fall asleep when I read it to him He focuses on tedious descriptions of the less interesting aspects of hiking while glossing over or ignoring the interesting locations and their history There were not enough pictures and those included were of poor quality and in black and white at least in the kindle version His transitions were jumpy and sometimes confusing It was really just a log of events lacking any meaningful insights or interesting facts At most this is useful if you are thinking of hiking the AT and want a feel for what it s like from day to day If you want to read about the AT I would recommend A Walk In The Woods by Bill Bryson This book just made me want to read that one again I ve been trying to figure out what I want to say about this one Hiking journals really appeal to me I love them I think this is something I want to do, but certainly not on my own and I want to be thoroughly prepared This was a good hiking journal He was, for the most part, prepared He just didn t get his pre hikes in and test his pack and a few other trivial things like his shoes, but he made a lot of good decisions Of course nothing will work out 100% Not sure why I am so drawn to thi I ve been trying to figure out what I want to say about this one Hiking journals really appeal to me I love them I think this is something I want to do, but certainly not on my own and I want to be thoroughly prepared This was a good hiking journal He was, for the most part, prepared He just didn t get his pre hikes in and test his pack and a few other trivial things like his shoes, but he made a lot of good decisions Of course nothing will work out 100% Not sure why I am so drawn to this I have read another about the PCT It was interesting but this person was the opposite of prepared He chose an appropriate name for himself and I love that he recorded what was around him I noted that most times he was an observer and didn t get in the middle of anything and I thought that was smart It is a good and interesting book Subjects skip really fast, but I think that is to be expected I don t agree with how he did this like leaving his family but I understand at another level I understand the madness of cubicles Jail cells are bigger I couldn t do anything like this without my husband The biggest experiences in my life have to include him They just do I ve been away from him enough thank you very much Besides, that way we could each carry half the supplies and divide the camp duties I would want him to be with me for that No doubt And when it comes to us two heads are better than one One of us always thinks of something the other might not It doesn t seem like an easy thing even when you are prepared but being able to complete it seems glorious I liked reading this I was glad for the footnotes He should have includedfootnotes Recommended for those who love outdoors or those who like to live vicariously I listened to this memoir be narrated Unfortunately, the whole time I couldn t help but compare it A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson, which is another recounting of hiking the Appalachian Trail, only that book is very funny and there seemed to beharrowing moments This memoir was too dry, although with vivid and endless accounts of his physical aches that made me think once again that people who attempt to do the whole trail are out of their minds Forreviews, please visit http I listened to this memoir be narrated Unfortunately, the whole time I couldn t help but compare it A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson, which is another recounting of hiking the Appalachian Trail, only that book is very funny and there seemed to beharrowing moments This memoir was too dry, although with vivid and endless accounts of his physical aches that made me think once again that people who attempt to do the whole trail are out of their minds Forreviews, please visit I love a good outdoor memoir, and this is an excellent account of a man who quit his job in 2003 to hike all 2,172 miles of the Appalachian Trail David Miller has a straightforward writing style and is blunt about how punishing the trail can be his woes during the hike included a sprained ankle, infected blisters, knee pain and blackened toenails.Despite such setbacks, Miller was a strong hiker and often coveredthan 20 miles a day an impressive pace considering he was carrying a 35 po I love a good outdoor memoir, and this is an excellent account of a man who quit his job in 2003 to hike all 2,172 miles of the Appalachian Trail David Miller has a straightforward writing style and is blunt about how punishing the trail can be his woes during the hike included a sprained ankle, infected blisters, knee pain and blackened toenails.Despite such setbacks, Miller was a strong hiker and often coveredthan 20 miles a day an impressive pace considering he was carrying a 35 pound backpack and that the trail has innumerable ascents and descents He had some nice passages on why he chose to hike the trail and what the adventure meant to him Working a nine to five job tookenergy than I had expected, leaving less time to pursue diverse interests I grew to detest the statement I am a with the sentence completed by an occupational title Self help books emphasize defining priorities and staying focused, euphemisms for specialization and stifling spontaneity Our vision becomes so narrow that risk is trying a new brand of cereal, and adventure is watching a new sitcom Over time I have elevated my opinion of nonconformity nearly to the level of an obligation We should have a bias toward doing activities that we don t normally do to keep loose the moorings of society It is easiest to characterize the AT in terms of its most challenging and spectacular features Most people have experienced the difficulty of steep uphill climbs, rocky terrain, and pestering bugs Likewise, spectacular overlooks and scenic waterfalls have universal appeal But I have come to recognize that most of what is memorable and pleasing about my time on the trail is ordinary moments in the outdoors Simply sitting unhurried in the shade of leaves is an irreplaceable moment It is a joy in itself to amble through the woods for hours, even when views are limited to the dense trees surrounding me It is fulfilling to be saturated with the sights, sounds, and smells of the outdoors My fond recollections of my hike are full of unremarkable moments, like the smell of a dewy morning, the crunch of leaves underfoot, the blaze of a campfire, the soothing trickle of a stream, or the rays of sun through a maze of trees From the Epilogue As a result of my hike, I am muchinclined to do things I will have fewer should have dones, even if it means incurring some wish I hadn ts I have changed in smaller ways, too I am friendlier andpatient I worry less about money I can get by with less It is as pleasing to get rid of old stuff as it is to get new stuff Excess is a burden, even when you are not carrying it around on your back Sidenote I am also a fan of Bill Bryson s book, A Walk in the Woods, which is ahumorous take on walking the Appalachian Trail However, those familiar with Bryson s book know that he didn t come close to walking the entire trail he only did a few sections Part of the reason I enjoyed Miller s book so much is that it filled in the blanks on what the rest of the trail was like In 1981 Chris Miller, having graduated from High School and not ready to go to college, took off hiking around Florida Then after a couple weeks he hitchhiked to Georgia and started hiking the Appalachian Trail no tent, no stove, no money, no plan When he got to Damascus, VA, having accomplished the first 465 miles of the trail, he decided to go on and do the whole thing And he did That s all we re told in his brother David Miller s book AWOL on the Appalachian Trail I want to knowIn 1981 Chris Miller, having graduated from High School and not ready to go to college, took off hiking around Florida Then after a couple weeks he hitchhiked to Georgia and started hiking the Appalachian Trail no tent, no stove, no money, no plan When he got to Damascus, VA, having accomplished the first 465 miles of the trail, he decided to go on and do the whole thing And he did That s all we re told in his brother David Miller s book AWOL on the Appalachian Trail I want to know.In 2003 David, then 41 years old, was having a typical mid life crisis After a year of planning and considering options, he quit his job and headed out deliberately, with full support of his wife and three girls, and hiked the entire Appalachian Trail but see the last paragraph We are never told how much his brother s hike from 21 years earlier influenced him, even subconsciously It leaves me wondering about sibling rivalry, how close the brothers are, etc Again I found myself cravinginformation.A good story teller might have jumped on this opportunity to addrichness to the narrative But David Miller is not a story teller He s a reporter he wrote bi weekly newspaper articles about his hike as he was doing it, and originally never intended to write a book at all When he did, it turned out to be essentially a long report a chronicle of his experience.Professionally David is a computer software engineer And his writing style is exactly what you would expect from one who carefully writes and debugs computer code It is free of typos and grammatical errors, heavy on simple, short declarative sentences, is written in the first person present tense, and when he discusses his emotions in his narrative he tends to describe them rather than immersing the reader in them It left me with the overall impression of a workmanlike piece of prose it got the job done, and done pretty well, but remained very squarely inside the box.And maybe that s a good thing As it turns out, AWOL on the Appalachian Trail , David s personal memoir, has become a companion to his popular yearly updated The AT Guide a no frills encyclopedia of data and information for the hiker who is actually on the trail living the experience for him herself The two books complement each other well AWOL on the Appalachian Trail contains relatively little information about David s gear or his planning It leaps directly into his first day on the trail at Springer Mountain and concludes with his summit day on Katahdin with his wife and oldest daughter In between it tends to focus about equally on trail description and his personal battles with various health issues, description of fellow hikers and hostel keepers and his interactions with them, and elaborate, glowing analysis every long distance hiker identifies with this of very ordinary food As such, the strength of the book is that it gives the reader a good solid feel for the day to day reality of doing a thru hike with enough detail to make it real, but not so much that it becomes tedious Finding that balance is a hard thing for a writer to do, and the continuing popularity of this book is testament to the fact that David did it well.Okay, now for the niggling little personal pet peeve The hard core every white blaze purist would say that David s hike, as described, was incomplete When I hiked my double in 2012 I followed the marked official trail route without fail once northbound, once southbound , and always meticulously connected my invisible footprints from one day s segment to the next So this point stood out for me David skipped a half mile around the Loft Mountain Campground in Shenandoah National Park, VA and an even shorter bit of the upper end of Crawford Path between the West Side Trail and the summit of Mt Washington, NH No big deal he hiked his own hike in his own way it does not detract one iota from my respect for the man or this book It s just one of those peculiar things that you mention when you re reviewing a book that already has a bazillion reviews and are looking for something original to say before you utter the obligatory great book , highly recommended , one of the top five Appalachian Trail hiking books of all time David s book is all of those things Bottom line it s an accessible, balanced every man s memoir which has inspired uncounted hundreds or even thousands of prospective AT hikers Bravo I loved this book If you have ever wanted to hike the Appalachian Trailor live vicariously through someone who has.this book is a must read Mr Miller gives so much information about so many things like the towns that are frequent stops for many thru hikers, keeping on the correct trail , safety and so muchHe lived his dream and even ended up writing The AT Trail, which is updated yearly It talks about his decision to quit his job and all that is associated with that and how hi I loved this book If you have ever wanted to hike the Appalachian Trailor live vicariously through someone who has.this book is a must read Mr Miller gives so much information about so many things like the towns that are frequent stops for many thru hikers, keeping on the correct trail , safety and so muchHe lived his dream and even ended up writing The AT Trail, which is updated yearly It talks about his decision to quit his job and all that is associated with that and how his family supported him for his nearly 5 month trek I especially loved learning about all the nicknames of all the hikers.his of course was AWOL which he explains in the bookand all the different personalities of some of them I really enjoyed this one.can t get enough backpacking, mountain climbing, true story booksthey are my favorite genre I was bored waiting to give my mom a ride home from work and saw this somewhere on a kindle book list and checked it out I live in Appalachia, East TN to be exact, the most beautiful part, and have friends that have hiked sections of the AT I DL d the sample chapters.I was hooked The author s prose is fun and addictive He is informative but it doesn t feel like he s trying to be, and he entertains seemingly effortlessly It s a dude, hiking a trail, and his experience How interesting could I was bored waiting to give my mom a ride home from work and saw this somewhere on a kindle book list and checked it out I live in Appalachia, East TN to be exact, the most beautiful part, and have friends that have hiked sections of the AT I DL d the sample chapters.I was hooked The author s prose is fun and addictive He is informative but it doesn t feel like he s trying to be, and he entertains seemingly effortlessly It s a dude, hiking a trail, and his experience How interesting could it be Very, and fun, and cool, and there are characters both fully fleshed out and recurring I don t really have any complaints It wasn t action packed, it wasn t epic, it wasn t super suspenseful like a thriller murder investigation account might be But it was one man s insightful account of his experience in one of America s most incredible regions and he executes it nearly flawlessly Great nonfiction, a nice light read that ll leave you with a few gems of wisdom 4.25 Ayear old engineer quits his job to hike the Appalachian Trail This is a true account of his hike from Georgia to Maine, bringing to the reader the life of the towns and the people he meets along the way I ve always enjoyed real life adventure stories, and although some of the reviewers criticized Miller s writing style, I thought it was well suited to the genre His prose is simple and straightforward, and I was never bored I read this book in a few days sitting on the porch of a mountain cabin, which seemed a perfect setting for getting into the spirit of an AT thru hiker David Awol Miller does an excellent job of taking what can be a feat too easy to romanticize or see through rose colore I ve always enjoyed real life adventure stories, and although some of the reviewers criticized Miller s writing style, I thought it was well suited to the genre His prose is simple and straightforward, and I was never bored I read this book in a few days sitting on the porch of a mountain cabin, which seemed a perfect setting for getting into the spirit of an AT thru hiker David Awol Miller does an excellent job of taking what can be a feat too easy to romanticize or see through rose colored glasses, and make it very real From an infected heel blister to sprained ankle, to the unrelenting rainstorms, to the stench of unwashed thru hikers he meets along the way, Awol made me feel like I was there, hiking along with him And although I don t have the desire to do a long thru hike at my age and because I wouldn t want to deal with staying in close proximity with other thru hikers strangers in tight, spartan quarters along the way , he still managed to convey enough of the excitement and adventure of embarking upon such an adventure to make me think what if