!!> Reading ➽ Two Friends ➶ Author Dean Robbins – Entrecielos.co

An introduction to two very important historical figures which imagines shared ideas over shared cups of tea and discusses each person s legacy.I like the way the questions posed in both back stories are similar, which helps readers understand why these two people made for logical allies friends The questions both Anthony and Douglass ask themselves are powerful and written at a level that is perfectly suited to the audience Also, I like that the questions arise aft A clever, spare narrative imagines a meeting of the suffragette and former slave and abolitionist, at her home in Rochester, New York Superbly illustrated by Selina Alko and Sean Qualls I wish the author had included suggestions for further reading. Some People Had Rights, While Others Had None.Why Shouldn T They Have Them, Too Two Friends, Susan B Anthony And Frederick Douglass, Get Together For Tea And Conversation They Recount Their Similar Stories Fighting To Win Rights For Women And African Americans The Premise Of This Particular Exchange Between The Two Is Based On A Statue In Their Hometown Of Rochester, New York, Which Shows The Two Friends Having Tea. Susan B Anthony and Frederick Douglass became friends in Rochester, New York where there is a statue showing them having tea together The story imagines what it might have been like when they met, but it also shares a little of each of their childhoods Susan loved to learn, but was denied that right because she was a woman Frederick was born a slave, and escaped to the north, learning to read and then wonder why he couldn t do what others did As Anthony and Douglas grew to adulthood, both Susan B Anthony and Frederick Douglass became friends in Rochester, New York where there is a statue showing them having tea together The story imagines what it might have been like when they met, but it also shares a little of each of their childhoods Susan loved to learn, but was denied that right because she was a woman Frederick was born a slave, and escaped to the north, learning to read and then wonder why he couldn t do what others did As Anthony and Douglas grew to adulthood, both continued to question the denial of their rights, to vote, to do all the things that white men could They never stopped fighting for those rights The illustrations are realistic with bold color, with some background parts showing swirls of words surrounding these two famous people There are parts of the Constitution, parts of the speeches and articles each wrote There is an author s note and a bibliography at the back The book can start many conversations about Anthony and Douglas, what they did, how th This book introduces children to history throughout the whole book It starts off with the friendship between Susan B Anthony and Frederick Douglass, the 19th century civil rights heros It teaches them about friendships and the causes they fought and spoke for This book also shows how th Text 4 starsIllustrations 4 starsHistorical fiction picture book An imagined meeting of abolitionist Frederick Douglass and suffragette Susan B Anthony who were contemporaries, colleagues, and friends in real life Informative author s note in the back of the book puts the time period in further per So many speeches to give So many articles to write So many minds to change Susan B Anthony and Frederick Douglass are both vocal advocates for equal rights in their time In Two Friends Susan B Anthony and Frederick Douglass 2016 by Dean Robbins, illustrated by Sean Qualls and Selina Alko, Robbins imagines what it must have been like when Anthony and Douglass met at her home to discuss their ideas.Although Two Friends is a fictionali Originally reviewed for YA Books Central simple, visually engrossing introduction to the concept of equality.Two champions of human rights meet for tea The premise is interesting, as well as historically accurate Susan B Anthony and Frederick Douglass did indeed become friends in the mid 1800 s, drawn together by the similarity of their causes Equal right and freedom for all And as the Author s note at the very end reveals insignificant detai Originally reviewed for YA Books Central simple, visually engrossing introduction to There was a time when all women and all African Americans had two things in common neither group had rights and both groups had someone working hard to get them the rights they deserved according to the US Constitution.In this meeting of suffragette Susan B Anthony and former slave, abolitionist, and newspaper editor Frederick Douglass at her home in Rochester, NY, author Dean Robbins imagines what the two pioneers in the fight for equal rights might have talked about when they sat down for a There was a time when all women and all African Americans had two things in common neither group had rights and both groups had someone working hard to get them the rights they deserved according to the US Constitution.In this meeting of suffragette Susan B Anthony and former slave, abolitionist, and newspaper editor Frederick Douglass at her home in Rochester, NY, author Dean Robbins imagines what the two pioneers in the fight for equal rights might have talked about when I was horrified to discover how historically misleading the book is The ending and the afterword suggest that these two major historical figures walked arm in arm into the sunset, working toward their joint goals for the rest of their lives Nothing could be further from the truth It was unfortunate that the only fact checking for the book came from someone at the Susan B Anthony Museum, since it s in their interest to make her look good and to minimize the later conflict between these two fig I was horrified to discover how historically misleading the book is The ending and the afterword suggest that these two major historical figures walked arm in arm into the sunset, working toward their joint goals for the rest of their lives Nothing could be further from the truth It was unfortunate that the only fact checking for the book came from someone at the Susan B Anthony Museum, since it s in their interest to make her look good and to minimize