[[ download books ]] The Innocents Abroad Author Mark Twain – Entrecielos.co

Hailed By The New York Herald As An Oasis In The Desert Of Works On Foreign Travel, The Innocents Abroad Was A Great Success When First Published, And It Remained The Bestselling Of All Twain S Works Throughout His Lifetime It Shows The Author At The Height Of His Literary Power As He Records Razor Sharp, Often Hilarious, Observations Of The People He Meets And Places He Visits During A Trip To Europe And The Holy Land In 1867.Originally A Series Of Travel Letters Written For A San Francisco Newspaper, The Book Presents A Refreshingly Honest And Vivid View Of Such Places As Tangier, Marseilles, Gibraltar, Rome, Constantinople, And Damascus Twain S Humor Takes A Particularly Satirical Turn Toward Tourists Who Rely On Travel Guidebooks Rather Than Personal Impressions To Define Their Travel Experiences The Book Alternates Light Hearted Chapters With Serious Passages Involving History, Statistics, And Descriptions Of Religious Relics, Artwork, And Architecture.From Amusements And Tribulations At Sea, Viewing The Outrageous Cancan In Paris, And Witnessing The Notable Sights Of Venice, To Observing The Grandeur Of St Peter S, Ascending Vesuvius, And Contemplating The Remains Of Solomon S Temple, This Classic Will Delight A Wide Audience, Including Longtime Fans Of The American Humorist And Anyone Who Enjoys An Entertaining And Enlightening Travel Book This Edition Also Includes All The Illustrations From The Original Publication.


10 thoughts on “The Innocents Abroad

  1. Mike Mike says:

    When I lived in Madrid years ago I used to buy pistachios from an Iranian refugee in Retiro Park I don t recall his name, but I decided to call him Stan It drove him crazy, but I called him Stan anyway Why did I call him Stan One word Ferguson.Ferguson is every tour guide that graces the pages of Mark Twain s The Innocents Abroad The author and his cohort call their guides Ferguson, whether in Paris or in Athens The name drives each Ferguson crazy, but they do it anyway And regardless of When I lived in Madrid years ago I used to buy pistachios from an Iranian refugee in Retiro Park I don t recall his name, but I decided to call him Stan It drove him crazy, but I called him Stan anyway Why did I call him Stan One word Ferguson.Ferguson is every tour guide that graces the pages of Mark Twain s The Innocents Abroad The author and his cohort call their guides Ferguson, whether in Paris or in Athens The name drives each Ferguson crazy, but they do it anyway And regardless of the site, or museum, their attitude before the remains of some long ago Renaissan...


  2. Michael Michael says:

    I love certain travel books, ones that give you an inspiring window on places you ve never been or want to revisit while holding a humbling mirror up to the perspective and culture of the traveler Innocents Abroad is a classic that fulfills this goal nicely and a fun read to boot In 1867, the nearly unknown journalist Mark Twain set out at age 32 on a chartered ship from New York wit...


  3. Patrick Patrick says:

    This novel is part stand up comedy and part history lesson Throughout the novel Twain is hysterically funny, irreverent, lampooning, and blatantly racist a classic American traveling abroad This travel log touches upon almost every tourist spot in Europe, North Africa, and the Holy Land Twain covers many of the most important sites in Europe in a thorough manner The text would become tedious if not for the wit and clever turning of phrases throughout the work The humor does have quite an e This novel is part stand up comedy and part history lesson Throughout the novel Twain is hysterically funny, irreverent, lampooning, and blatantly racist a classic American traveling abroad This travel log touches upon almost every tourist spot in Europe, North Africa, and the Holy Land Twain covers many of the most important sites in Europe in a thorough manner The text would become tedious if not for the wit and clever turning of phrases throughout the work The humor does have quite an edge The racism and bigotry showed by the author in this piece does not kill the story, in my estimation, it only makes Twain a man of his time.Mark Twain walks up to the top inside the Leaning Tower of Pisa, visits Florence and the Vatican, sees ho...


  4. Bryce Wilson Bryce Wilson says:

    God you ve got to love Twain A funny sacred cow roasting romp through Europe and The Middle East, taking on stereotypes, high society, and decorum with a shotgun blast to the face However, this is young amused by humanities flaws Mark Twain, not embittered Fuck the World ...


  5. Chrissie Chrissie says:

    This armchair travel guide is based on an actual journey made by Twain in 1867 He was only thirty two It first came out in the New York Herald, peu peu as he sent in his journal entries Only later in 1869 was it published as a book The excursion route can be seen here clicking on the map you are linked to the text in the book referring to the particular location In this way you can check out Twain s writing.So what makes this a classic, and why This armchair travel guide is based on an actual journey made by Twain in 1867 He was only thirty two It first came out in the New York Herald, peu peu as he sent in his journal entries Only later in 1869 was it published as a book The excursion route can be seen here clicking on the map you are linked to the text in the book referring to the particular location In this way you can check out Twain s writing.So what makes this a classic, and why is it so highly praised ...


  6. Phillip Ozdemir Phillip Ozdemir says:

    When you read Twain you realize he is head and shoulders above other authors, even really good authors How do you measure the level of his genius I don t know Physicists used to rate the genius level of other physicists on a scale of 1 10, and then along came Dick Feynman whom everyone agreed was off scale Twain s ability as a writer might just be off scale , to...


  7. Derek Derek says:

    10 percent humorous versus 90 percent tedium And that may even be a generous assessment.The humor is actually laugh out loud humor and I rarely LOL while reading but the tedium oh, the tedium It becameandof a trudge I may yet give this another try, as I really do wa...


  8. Maggie Maggie says:

    This is one of those books which I think time has not been kind to All of the information was interesting, the little stories were a mixture of merely amusing, hysterically funny, and over the top annoying, and then there were the chapters which were absolutely fabulous so well written and beautiful that I begged for an entire book of that kind of writing Part of the problem here is that the world has become so politically correct that all the members of my book club agreed that we cringed at This is one of those books which I think time has not been kind to All of the information was interesting, the little stories were a mixture of merely amusing, h...


  9. Thom Swennes Thom Swennes says:

    Mark Twain s Innocents Abroad is a travel book I have no doubt that it is a travel book because that is exactly how Mark Twain described it It is, however, muchthan a travel book It is a classic example of how American soften than not behave in foreign countries The passing of 145 years published in 1867 hasn t changed the American mentality in the least Twain s pilgrimage was to southern Europe and the Holy Lands His descriptions of fellow passengers and people they met we Mark Twain s Innocents Abroad is a travel book I have no doubt that it is a travel book because that is exactly how Mark Twain described it It is, however, muchthan a travel book It is a classic example of how American soften than not behave in foreign countries The passing of 145 years published in 1867 hasn t changed the American mentality in the least Twain s pilgrimage was to southern Europe and the Holy Lands His descriptions of fellow passengers and people they met were both colorful and humorous As an American expatriate in Europe I can see and enjoy both sides of his described confrontations This volume of prose also affords the reader a rare glimpse at the true Sam...


  10. Marc Weitz Marc Weitz says:

    I found myself anxious to read this book expecting to enjoy the application of Mark Twain s wit to traveling abroad in Europe in 1867 The wit was there but hidden away amongst loads and loads of boring descriptions and events Reading this book was like watching soccer there were moments of interest tucked away in long minutes of people running around in a circle So much so, that when the funny or interesting parts came up, I found that I would miss the beginning because I had zoned out.This I found myself anxious to read this book expecting to enjoy the application of Mark Twain s wit to traveling abroad in Europe in 1867...