[[ read online ]] Persians Author Aeschylus – Entrecielos.co

Aeschylus wrote over ninety plays, and of the 7 that survive complete today, Persians is one of them This may not seem like anything particularly noteworthy, anyso than any of his plays having survived, until you take into account its historical importance Aeschylus was Greek, and fought the Persians at the Battle of Salamis, during the second Persian invasion of Greece you re probably familiar with the contemporary battle of Thermopile, immortalized so well in Frank Miller s book300 Aeschylus wrote over n A celebration of a Greek victory13 March 2012 This is actually quite an unusual Greek play in that it does not deal with a mythological event Granted Aristophanes deals with historical events, but he wrote comedy as opposed to tragedy and I have explained elsewhere what is meant by Greek Tragedy Excluding Aristophanes, The Persians is the only historical play that we have, and it is possible that it is the only historical play that was ever written during the classical period of Ancient Gree A celebration of a Greek victory13 March 2012 This is actually quite an unusual Greek play in that it does not deal with a mythological event Granted Aristophanes deals with historical events, but he wrote comedy as opposed to tragedy and I have explained elsewhere what is meant by Greek Tragedy Excluding Aristophanes, The Persians is the only historical play that we have, and it is possible that it is the only historical play that was ever written during the classical period of Ancient Greece The play is about the Persian defeat at Salamis and is set entirely within the palace in Susa Once again as we always see the unities of time and place are obeyed While many seem to poin 3.5 starsThe Persiansis a poetic play about the Greeks defeating the Persians It was narrated from the Persians point of view, but had all of the Greek strength and valor whispered to you I can picture this play creating a pa ,, ,,,, XERXES Wail, wail the miserable doom, and to the palace hie CHORUS Alas, alas, and woe again XERXES Shriek, smite the breast, as I CHORUS An evil gift, a sad exchange, of tears poured out in vain XERXES Shrill out your simultaneous wail CHORUS Alas the woe and pain XERXES O, bitter is this adverse fate CHORUS I voice the moan with thee XERXES Smite, smite thy bosom, groan aloud for my calamity CHORUS I mourn and am dissolved in tears XERXES Cry, beat thy breast amain CHORUS O king, m XERXES Wail, wail the miserable doom, and to the palace hie CHORUS Alas, alas, and woe again XERXES Shriek, smite the breast, as I CHORUS An evil gift, a sad exchange, of tears poured out in vain XERXES Shrill out your simultaneous wail CHORUS Alas the woe and pain XERXES O, bitter is this adverse fate CHORUS I voice the moan with thee XERXES Smite, smite thy bosom, groan aloud for my calamity CHORUS I mourn and am dissolved in tears XERXES Cry, beat thy breast amain CHORUS O king, my heart is in thy woe XERXES Shriek, wail, and shriek again CHORUS O agony XERXES A blackening blow CHORUS A grievous stripe shall fall XERXES Yea, b ,,,. Written in 472 B.C., Aeschylus s Persians is the oldest surviving play in the history of Western drama How astonishing, then, to consider that the first piece of Greek tragedy to come down to us was written not from a Greek perspective, but ostensibly from that of an implacable enemy defeated a mere eight years prior an enemy that had terrorized all the Greeks, enslaved many of them, and had sacked the very city in which the play was first performed Aeschylus, along with many of the play s or Written in 472 B.C., Aeschylus s Persians is the oldest surviving play in the history of Western drama How astonishing, then, to consider that the first piece of Greek tragedy to come down to us was written not from a Greek perspective, but ostensibly from that of an implacable enemy defeated a mere eight years prior an enemy that had terrorized all the Greeks, enslaved many of them, and had sacked the very city in which the play was first performed Aeschylus, along with many of the play s original viewers, was likely at the Battle of Salamis The graphic imagery conjured by the Persian Messenger the sea being so cluttered with corpses and debris that one couldn t see the water bodies clustering on the shoreline like litter Athenian marines using the splintered, jagged ends of their rowing oars to skewer wounded Persians in the water like Los Persas es la tragedia m s antigua que se ha conservado de Esquilo, donde retrata la gloriosa victoria de Grecia sobre los Persas, hecho vivido por l mismo C mo va a dignificar a Grecia en una tragedia Para hacerlo, Esquilo pone como protagonista a los persas, compuesto por un coro de ancia What s done, I know, is done yet I will sacrificeIn hope that time may bring about some better fate the mother of Xerxes3 1 2Bust of Aeschylus From the Capitoline Museums, RomeAeschylus c 525 524 c 456 455 BC is the earliest of the four great Greek playwrights, parts of whose oeuvre have survived to the present day The others are, of course, Sophocles c 497 6 winter 406 5 BC and Euripides c 480 c 406 BC these three tragedians and the comic playwright Aristophanes c 446 What s done, I know, is done yet I will sacrificeIn hope that time may b The First Surviving Play In The History Of Western Drama The Persians Represents A Courageous Act On The Part Of Its Author The Subject Of Aeschylus Play Was, In Part, The Conquering Of The Persians By The Greeks, But He Presented That Event To His Greek Audience Not From Their Point Of View, But From That Of The Defeated Persians Accordingly, The Greeks Were Faced With A Very Human Portrait Of A People That They Had Only Recently Enslaved The Effect Was To Make The Enemy Knowable, To Show The Humanity Of A People Which War As It Has Since Time Immemorial Had Generalized And Dehumanized The Lesson Of Aeschylus Play Speaks Just As Clearly Today As It Did For The Ancient Greeks The Enemy Is Always Us, Human Beings With Shared Even If Slightly Dissimilar Aspirations And Dreams As Director Peter Sellars Points Out In His Introduction, By Humanizing The Enemy, Aeschylus Begins To Suggest That We Have Much To Learn About Ourselves Through The Eyes Of Others, And That What We Think We Know About Others Should Be Questioned And Expanded In This Modern Version Of Aeschylus Play Robert Auletta Shifts The Action Of The Play From Persia To A Modern Day Iraq, And, Like Aeschylus, Asks Americans To Question And Challenge Their Views Of Our Recently Defeated Enemies.